A comprehensive randomized control study that came out earlier this year suggests that engaging in moderate aerobic exercise can significantly increase male fertility rates in previously infertile men. The study was conducted over a 24-week intervention period, with both exercise and non-exercise groups being physically similar in terms of body composition, semen quality, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress.

Throughout the course of the study, measurements were taken against baseline measurements, showing significant improvements in the exercise group in following areas: Increase in Vo2 Max, which measures aerobic capacity, an increase in semen quality and decrease in sperm DNA damage, decreased markers of oxidative stress, and decreased pro-inflammatory markers. Furthermore, during and post intervention, there were more total pregnancies and live births in the exercise group than in the control group, which reported 0% live births.

As the exercise subjects became more aerobically active, they experienced decreased body weight and body fat during the intervention. The decrease in oxidative stress is attributed to an increase in exercise-induced antioxidant enzymes. It was also reported that discontinuing exercise four weeks after the intervention period was not a long enough period have a significant adverse effect on fertility and pregnancy outcomes.

The take-away for men and couples hoping to increase their fertility, is that even a little goes a long way. Try to incorporate moderate physical activity into your lifestyle, 3-4 days/week, for at least 25 minutes per bout. Examples of moderate physical activity include:

  1. Brisk walk

  2. Light jog

  3. Heavy cleaning

  4. Mowing the lawn

  5. Light bicycling (10-12 miles/hour)

  6. Tennis- doubles

  7. Recreational badminton

  8. Hiking

  9. Recreational swimming

  10. Kayaking in calm water

By Rima Sidhu, MS

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Many diet gurus, workout fiends, and nutrition specialists have been touting the benefits of the Paleo diet. A Paleo diet is named appropriately because it focuses on eating foods available only in the Paleolithic Age, when our ancestors were hunters and gatherers. This eliminates ALL processed foods, refined grains, cereals, and milk. Only fruits, vegetables, meats, nuts and seeds are allowed. The diet makes sense because evidence has shown that processed foods and sugars are responsible for many health issues. It increases the consumption of meats, fruits, and vegetables, which add nutrients and antioxidants to the diet.


Some of the health benefits of the Paleo diet include weight loss, reduced inflammation, increased satiety, regulated blood sugar levels, and corrected nutrient deficiencies. The diet is high in protein and fat, and since it’s all-natural, it is filled with nutrient rich foods.


Foods that should be avoided on the Paleo diet are refined sugars, refined oils, dairy, legumes (including peanuts, beans, and tofu), salt, potatoes, cereal grains, starches, and alcohol. Many Paleo experts allow grass-fed butter since it is more a fat than a dairy product, but that is a little controversial. Other controversial foods are pseudo-grains, such as quinoa. Quinoa is not strictly Paleo, but some people on Paleo diets eat it from time to time. It should be avoided if weight loss is the goal or if there are gut issues.


If your goal is weight loss, certain foods that are considered Paleo should be consumed in moderation. For example, butternut squash, acorn squash, yams, sweet potatoes, and beets are starchy vegetables. While technically allowed, their high starch content increases blood sugar levels and may promote weight gain, so they should be consumed in moderation. Additionally, processed meats and meat high in fat should be avoided since they provide more calories and fat. While fruits are Paleo-approved, they are also high in natural sugars, so consumption should be limited to once a day, with the focus on low glycemic fruits, such as berries and apples.


Some critics of the Paleo diet state that the diet may be too high in protein and difficult for many people to follow. Additionally, the diet is high in seafood. Many types of fish and shellfish are very high in toxins. However, in general, I believe the benefits of the diet far outweigh the negatives. In fact, if your goal is to lose weight in 2018, a version of the Paleo diet is a great way to start off the New Year!


By Denise Groothuis MS RD

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Every year we all make our lists of New Year Resolutions and promise ourselves to get in better shape. The truth is less than 7% of us will actually change anything. If you really want to change, then you have to push yourself out of your comfort zone and challenge yourself. Workout like you are 19 years old and willing to really sweat and be exhausted and sore. Figure out what motivates you and what kind of workout you enjoy. If you like running, do that. If you prefer elliptical or biking, do that. And if you prefer varying your work out, mix it up.


Nobody has enough time to work out the way they want to. I try to get an hour work out in before work; unfortunately, I can usually only do 30 minutes. We need to maximize the use of the minutes we have in the gym to be as efficient as possible. Interval training has been shown to have much more benefit than standard work outs. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) has been shown to be even better than interval training.


A standard workout is going on the elliptical for 20 minutes at one speed. Interval training would be varying the resistance/speed with peaks and valleys during the workout. An HIIT workout would involve making the peaks much higher pushing you where your body cannot supply enough oxygen to the working muscles. This could include not only your leg and arm muscles but also your heart muscle. The HIIT workout will require your body to recover for hours after your workout. Your metabolism will be increased and you will be burning more calories for several hours even after you are done with your training. Short but intense workout challenges are the key to HIIT.


I was caught up in my routine workout and getting bored doing the same regimen for years. Then 3 months ago I decided to go on a bike trip to South America with my 19-year-old son. I knew I had to step up my training to avoid embarrassment and so I would not feel old next to a much younger real athlete. I started biking outside and then started spin classes as the weather got colder. Also, I hired a personal trainer to kick my butt and help me do new workouts. The trainer was smart and goal-oriented helping design a legs and core workout to get me ready for the mountains of Chile. Over the next 6 weeks, I lost about 7 lbs. and dropped my waist size. I also felt better and more energetic during the day. I was well prepared and did great biking abroad.


I am competitive by nature, and this is part of what motivates me. When I am in spin class I won’t quit because I would not let the person next to me work harder. When my son passes me on the bike, I am pushing myself to keep up or even try to pass him. A lot of the work is mind over matter. Find what motivates you and use it.


Whatever physical activity you do, you need to push yourself. However, make sure your body can handle the challenge. As a physician, I advise you to know your body and realize that in doing too much you can hurt yourself. You need to know your limits and if you are uncertain talk to your own physician. It is a new year. Decide to be one of the 7% that actually change yourself for the better in 2018.


By Rick Weinstein, MD, MBA


Director Orthopedic Surgery Westchester Sport & Spine at White Plains Hospital

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