• Wix Neon

Get Outside and Walk!

Walking is an underrated, under-utilized form of exercise. It is low-impact and easily accessible to anyone. For optimal health, we all know we must move. Exercise can be intimidating for some, especially in a gym setting. However, if you get outside and walk for a few minutes each day, you will see great results. The longer you walk, the more benefits you will see. Regular walking can help with losing/maintaining weight, preventing/managing various conditions including heart disease, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes, and it can be an excellent way to reduce stress. For those who suffer from knee, ankle, or back problems, it can also serve as a lower impact exercise that can be done multiple times per week for longer periods of time. Studies show that group nature walks are often associated with a whole host of mental health benefits including decreased depression, improved well-being & mental health, and lower stress levels. In addition, the positive effects on one’s mood are especially strong among people who recently experience a traumatic life event, such as a serious illness, death of a loved one, or divorce. Walking is often underrated as a form of exercise but the fact is it can be as good of a workout, if not better, than running. In fact, people who walk outdoors have been known to cover more distance in a faster time, noting that they feel less exertion on their body. Regardless of how old you are or what fitness level you may be at, get outside and walk! Your body will thank you for it. by Gina Stallone

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